Senhor José is a low-grade clerk in the city’s Central Registry, where the living and the dead share the same shelf space. A middle-aged bachelor, he has no. #saramago stories you’ll love. Read new stories about #saramago on Wattpad. Jose Saramago – Toate numeleby StoicaDaniel icon view 25 icon vote. Toate numele – Jose Saramago America fara etaje – Ilf si Petrov Jocul de smarald – Ioan Petru Culianu La capatul lumii si in tara aspra – Haruki.

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All the Names by José Saramago

Margaret Jull Costa Translator. A middle-aged jjose, he has no interest in anything beyond the certificates of birth, marriage, divorce, and death, that are his daily routine. But one day, when he comes across the records of an anonymous young woman, something happens to him.

Paperbackpages. Published October 5th by Mariner Books first published joes To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about All the Namesplease sign up. This question contains spoilers… view spoiler [Why did the boss approve of Senhor Jose’s strange quest and even reward him at the instead of firing, an outcome that the earlier depiction nu,ele him would suggest?

See 1 question about All the Names…. Lists with This Book. Apr 12, Petra Eggs rated it it was amazing Shelves: Generally when I write a review, I do it straight off and don’t edit much. I start off with the idea of what I want to say about the book and it flows from there. But not this time. I also don’t want to review the book s but just give my reactions to saramagoo.

These are books that will be easily spoiled if you know too much about them before you read them. Firstly it was by accident I read Death with Interruptions first and then this one.

That was fortuitious, as the other way round would have spoil Generally when I write a review, I do it straight off and don’t edit much. That was fortuitious, as the other way round sarajago have spoiled the ‘joke’ of Death’s filing cabinet.

The two books not only hang together, fit like pieces of a jigsaw, they toatte immensely revealing of Saramago’s preoccupations. One book was not enough for him to work out either the bureaucracy of death or unhealthy and insane obsessions with it, or of it come to that. I’ve just read the first few pages of reviews and to be honest none of them saw in the book what I did.

Küçük Anılar Çocukluk ve İlkgençlik Anıları – Jose Saramago

There were an awful lot of reviews in Arabic I could’t read though. The reviews that concentrate on story, the plot, I think miss out on Saramago generally. You don’t win the Nobel Prize for literature when you have such an annoying writing style if you just stick to fairly mundane stories. It’s what is behind the story that is the genius, what you dimly perceive and is illuminated more as the novel progresses and you see the workings of the utterly original author’s mind.

And if you read the books in the order I did, you will be stunned at his genius and hope that some day someone makes a film of these books. They are perfectly visual anyway. Then again all those reviewers might say I’ve just completely missed the point myself.

But this time, I think they’re wrong. Rewritten July 16th View all 18 comments. View all 6 comments. I never thought a novel about a lonely and duller than dull file clerk could turn out to be so readable, but that’s exactly how I found this, it was difficult to find a reasonable place to stop, of which I simply had to, as it’s a bit too long to gulp down in one go, although for those who don’t get fidgety cramps, don’t have much of an appetite, and with plenty of time on their hands, it may work out beneficial.

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In fact, this is the very book the protagonist of All the Names would likely read i I never thought a novel about a lonely and duller than dull file clerk could turn out to be so readable, but that’s exactly how I found this, it was difficult to find a reasonable place to stop, of which I simply had to, as it’s a bit too long to gulp down in one go, although for those who don’t get fidgety cramps, don’t have much of an appetite, and with plenty of time on their hands, it may work out beneficial.

In fact, this is the very book the protagonist of All the Names would likely read in one go, sat up in bed, with a cup of weak coffee, and an unfulfilling sandwich, as he doesn’t exactly have a busy schedule away from work, that is, until an unknown woman enters his life, no, he enters hers, only without her knowing it.

He eats, sleeps, and breathes them, day-to-day. But out of hours, he takes on the task to quell boredom most likely of tracking down a random female, from a random card, located within the Central Registry.

His nocturnal activities within the Central Registry are made that little bit easier seeing as he lives in an adjoining room to the main building. Within the first few pages, Saramago establishes a tension that sings and rises, producing engaging revelations that culminates when the final paragraphs twists expectations once again. The title simply refers to the miles of archival records among which the protagonist toils at the Registry of Births, Marriages and Deaths in an unnamed small city whose inhabitants still live by ancient and tight rules and regulations.

It’s the sort of system that East Germany would have been proud of. The registry is quixotically disorganized in places, the further you delve into the abyss, so that the files of those most recently deceased are buried under miles of paper at the furthest remove of the massive building that seems to go on forever. There’s no special reason for this pursuit, which becomes an elaborate and increasingly surreal catalogue of misdeeds and lies, but consumed by an overriding passion to find her, and taking more and more risks along the way, he is forced to become practical, clever, and brave, in ways he never thought possible.

Saramago relates the novels events in a finely honed and precise way, pervaded with irony, but also playfully mocking with humour.

All the Names

Alternately farcical, macabre, surreal and tragic, but also chilly in a kafkaesque way, his narrative depicts the loneliness of individual lives, and the universal need for human connection, even as it illuminates the fine line between those of the living and those of the dead. Speaking of soul, Saramago clearly had it in abundance. Not entirely positive about it’s ending though, so a minor smudge there, but that aside, All the Names was a top notch piece of fiction.

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Alina Busioc –

View all 4 comments. Apr 26, Michael Ferro rated it it taote amazing. What at first appears to be a simple story about a humdrum civil servant’s odd fascination with an unknown woman quickly becomes a stunning exploration of loneliness, bureaucratic absurdity, and the purpose of a meaningful life.

This is the first novel I’ve read by Nobel-winner Saramago, but it won’t be the last. Throughout the story, we are presented with wonderfully amusing anecdotes of satire concerning the operations of the day-to-day government.

Particularly amusing, at least to me, are the scenes taking place in the city’s municipal graveyard, describing its evolution over the centuries, as well as its relation to and competition with the Central Registry. This book was suggested to me by someone who had read my novel, TITLE 13, and mentioned that they both shared a similar outlook, especially in terms of satirizing the lowly position of clerks within a government.

Of course, Saramago is a master of the form and I wouldn’t dare to compare my own work with his, numel it was quite a treat to find a similar subject as my own handled with such skill. The author’s use of long, drawn out sentences and intricately detailed passages truly heightens the level of satire and parody and I am quite curious to know if this is the standard style of Saramago, or if it was just a technique employed for use in this novel.

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View all sarmago comments. May 22, BlackOxford rated it it was amazing Shelves: Registered Redemption Most of Saramago’s themes are found here: He would probably have reacted harshly to the suggestion that he had created perhaps ‘outlined’ is a better verb, but then again perhaps there is no adequate word at all a sort of religion without a deity, the core of which is a humble Registered Redemption Most of Saramago’s themes are found here: He would probably have reacted harshly to the suggestion that he had numel perhaps ‘outlined’ is a better verb, but then again perhaps there is no adequate word at all a sort of religion without a deity, the core of which is a humble irony laced with wit and grace.

Then again perhaps he wouldn’t object too forcefully; there are worse religious beliefs. For, sarzmago Aquinas taught so eloquently, each human being is indeed a distinct species and deserves recognition as such. It deserves its proper name. It would be interesting to know if Saramago was influenced by him in All the Names.

Jun 09, Greg rated it liked it Shelves: You didn’t need to give up the will to live just because I didn’t like your writing style. Lots of people did like you. More people liked you than like me. You shouldn’t have cared so much about what I thought. Now I feel like an asshole for killing you. I guess I can live with that, but it was a real douche bag move, dying the week I write a bad review about you just to add to my excessive guilt complexes.

You know what, I’m sorry that your dead and all, b Forward: You know what, I’m sorry that your dead and all, but fuck you, this was a low shot Saramago. Review When you’ve won the Nobel Prize for Literature you are above the criticisms of some schmuck who works for a corporate bookstore and writes reviews for books on the internet.

So now send me my check. Saramago should be smacked around with the pretentious stick. His prose style is so heavy handed and derivative in it’s originality that it turned me off of the book after only a handful of pages. The book could have been pretty fucking awesome.

It’s Borgesian in it’s paradoxical portrait of archives read “Library of Babel”-esque without hexagons ; and the atmosphere and setting of the novel is Kafkaian as opposed to Kafkaesque, which is a nonsensical and overused phrase that has lost all meaning, just rest assured that Kafkaian is legitimate, in the same manner that Orwell-esque is now the only acceptable manner for one to speak of doublespeak type situations, but only in an appropriate manner and may not be used for any kind of paranoid conspiracy Big Brother bullshit, if you want to say something about that the proper phrase is “the government is watching me”, there is no Big Brother, until such time that a cult of personality figure is in fact watching you, then it will be fine to use the term Orwell-esque to talk about the situation you find yourself in.

One I would think that a book that mixes the two great tastes of Borges and Kafka could do no wrong, but how wrong I one would be. Maybe if the writing style hadn’t been so heavy handed and Kafka-like aka, German in it’s dense paragraphs. Maybe once one enters into the Borges realm one needs to have a lighter hand on the old pen. Maybe this is the kind of story that should have been a story and not a novel and that there are reasons why Borges never wrote a novel. If you like clunky prose and interesting ideas this book might just tickle you in that special spot.

If not, then there are probably many finer books to read in the short time we have to spend reading on this mortal coil. View all 27 comments. View all 61 comments. Memory of a book read a few minutes ago. Remnants of images, impressions.